Category Archives: Events

2017 Gandhi-King Conference with Kaiya

This year I returned to the wonderful city of Memphis, TN to attend and facilitate a workshop at the Gandhi-King Conference. This was my sixth time attending the conference and this year the experience was that much more special because I got to share it with my (just turned) five-year old daughter, Kaiya.

There are a number of reasons why I love this conference, which happens every year and always takes place in Memphis. This year I facilitated a workshop, “Podcasting for Peace” during which I and the participants co-created an episode of the Peace Frequency – a podcast series I host and produce at the United States Institute of Peace. The series taps into the stories of people across the globe who are making peace possible and finding ways to create a world free of violent conflict. Through the co-creation process, participants learned about how the podcast series came to be and some of the ways in which I structure the episodes and facilitate conversation with guests. That was the main reason I came to Memphis, but the day to day experience is worth documenting.

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Music Plays Crucial Role in Nonviolent Civic Movements

This is another post about the Music of Nonviolent Action event that I helped organize and facilitate back in June of this year.

This post was written by Viola Granger and originally appeared on the United States Institute of Peace’s Olive Branch blog.

In Libya’s 2011 uprising, protesters pumped loud music from radios or CD players in the streets in front of government buildings, then fled from the inevitable rush of security forces. The nonviolent early days of Egypt’s revolution that same year spawned a raft of new independent music groups. In Turkey, the “Song of Pots and Pans” exhorts political leaders to stop their lies and repressive tactics.

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Rhythms at the Intersection of Peace and Conflict: The Music of Nonviolent Action

This past Tuesday, USIP and the Conflict Prevention & Resolution Forum co-hosted and event at USIP presenting an exciting new movie followed by a panel discussion on the intersection between music and nonviolent civic action.

My USIP colleague, Maria Stephan, and my Freedom Beat partner, Timothy O’Keefe envisioned  this event and over the course of several weeks we worked with our friends and USIP and with the CPRF to organize a great event that brought in over 75 people to USIP to explore an exciting topic in a creative way.

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Cultivating Peace in Our Schools Gathering


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On July 16th  and 17th, 2013 I helped organize and facilitate a 1.5 day intensive workshop for DC area teachers to learn about peace education programs and initiatives being implemented in the DC area. In this effort, I worked closely with Laurie Segel-Moss, Assistant Director of the Center for Peacebuilding and Development (CPD) and Maura Scully, Program Coordinator for the Mohammed Said Farsi Chair of Islamic Peace.

The purpose of the gathering was to elevate the peace education work that orgs, schools, and teachers are already doing throughout the DC area; escalate the work of peace education by integrating the skills, methods, and models developed by the featured organizations into the teachers’ educational practice, their classrooms, and schools; and spread these methods, models and programs to other teachers, classrooms and schools after experimenting with what was shared through this gathering.

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Advanced Seminar in Kingian Nonviolence

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This past week I participated in a week-long, intensive exploration of Kingian Nonviolence. The concepts, philosophies, and experiences that both informed and grew out of the Civil Rights Movement, helped advance an understanding of nonviolence – an understanding very much rooted in the vision and experimentation Dr. King brought to the struggle, hence the term “Kingian Nonviolence.”  After he was assassinated, those who had worked and organized alongside Dr. King set out to codify Kingian Nonviolence into a curriculum so that it could be carried on to the ensuing generations. This curriculum was developed by two prominent civil rights activists and leaders who worked alongside Dr. King in some of the movement’s most powerful nonviolent campaigns in Nashville, TN, Albany, GA, Chicago, IL and other communities across the US.  These two men are Dr. David Jehnsen and Dr. Bernard Lafayette.

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Walking Towards Community – A Restorative Approach, with Dominic Barter

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This past Saturday I attended a full-day workshop called, Walking Toward Community – A Restorative Justice Approach, with Dominic Barter. The workshop was held at the Quaker Meeting House in Dupont Circle and it brought together a great group of about 50-60 participants, some of whom I had met from other such events. The workshop was sponsored by the following organizations: DC RJ Network, DC Peace Team, The Peace Alliance, Shambhala Center, Critical Exposure, PeacexPeace, Little Friends for Peace, and Pax Christi.

I am somewhat familiar with restorative justice practices, and utilize elements of the practice, such as the talking circle, in many of my courses, but this was the first time I had an intense introduction to restorative justice specifically. I was not too familiar with Dominic Barter (restorativecircles.org), but I soon realized why many in the RJ field consider him to be one of the best RJ practitioners in the world.

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Ann Ferren Teaching Conference

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This past weekend I attended and presented at the Ann Ferren Teaching Conference, which is a yearly conference held every January at American University.  The last time I attended this conference was in 2010 and had gotten a lot out of it.  This year I was invited to be a co-presenter for one of the sessions, “Finding Your First Flip: Getting Started with the Flipped Classroom Model.  My co-presenters for this session were Maya Marato and Meghan Foster.  The Goal for this session is to engage faculty in the process of “flipping” their lectures by helping them identify and evaluate topics and activities that are easily adapted to the flipped classroom model.

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